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Edinburgh Genomics latest news

Edinburgh Genomics takes delivery of its first two HiSeqX

As part of the Scottish Genome Partnership, Edinburgh Genomics has taken delivery of its first two HiSeqX sequencing machines. These are the first part of an installation of 15 state-of-the-art instruments, divided between The Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, which will push the sequencing of whole human genomes to a new level. Researchers will be able to study the genomes of both healthy...

Exploring and exploiting the microbiome

The rise of metagenomics has allowed us to explore the human microbiome and that of domestic livestock, plants and the environment, offering interesting opportunities to exploit this knowledge for the health and wellbeing of all. The aim of this event is to raise awareness about Scotland’s considerable expertise in this area and to build links to support collaboration for the future. Taking the...

The University Chancellor has planted a tree to mark the start of work on Easter Bush Innovation Centre

The Easter Bush Innovation Centre will bring together the University’s veterinary teaching, research and enterprise activities in a vibrant, interactive core at the heart of the Campus. Royal Visit Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal visited the site, located next to the Roslin Institute, prior to construction which commences in March, as part of a visit to the University. Read more .

£15M boost for Scotland's gene research

Edinburgh Genomics is very excited to announce that we, with core support from the University of Edinburgh and in close collaboration with the University of Glasgow, have purchased an Illumina HiSeqX system. The official press release from the Universities (as the Scottish Genomes Partnership) and Illumina announcing the purchase is here . The HiSeqX is Illumina’s latest genome sequencing...

Oxford nanopore technologies

In 2012, the British company Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) presented a tiny DNA sequencer that plugs into a USB port and sequence DNA directly from blood using an engineered nanopore. Analysing its data is the next step in portable sequencing. BBSRC-funded training grants have played an important part in demonstrating that biological nanopores could differentiate between the individual DNA...

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